13 Great Firefox Extensions For Net Professionals

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Similar to web designers or Search Engine Optimisation professionals, I use a vast selection of methods to get the task done. I use a variety of web and desk-top applications, some acquired and some free. In case people fancy to get more about huffingtonpost.com/tyler-collins/, we recommend many on-line databases people might pursue. Everyone I know has downloaded a free copy of Mozilla Firefox, but few understand that by installing a number of the 1,500 free extensions they could eliminate the importance of all of the other applications they currently use. This great https://www.huffingtonpost.com/tyler-collins website has oodles of poetic aids for how to deal with it. Listed here are my 13 favorite extensions for internet professionals (in no particular order ):

HTML Validator (http://users.skynet.be/mgueury/mozilla/) validates website pages to the W3C HTML standards having a simple green check in the corner of the page if the page validates, a red check if it doesnt, and a yellow exclamation level if there are warnings. It also contains a sophisticated view of source code which allows one to see where errors are within the code.

FireFTP (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/684/) free, protected, cross-platform FTP client that provides intuitive and simple usage of FTP servers. This removes a piece of software for people who use a separate program for FTP.

Professor X (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/2823/) enables you to view header data without having to view source code. The page slides down and Professor X shows you the contents of the page's head element, including Meta, Script and Style content.

NikkelWHOIS (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/2646/) view the WHOIS data for any page by clicking the button on the top-right of the visitor.

IE Tab (http://ietab.mozdev.org) tired of when testing out a web page youre developing trading between Internet Explorer and Firefox? With IE Tab you will see Web Browser in a Firefox Case!

FireBug (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/1843/) an advanced debugger system that lets you observe your JavaScript, Ajax, HTML and CSS.

Codetech (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/1002/) web site editor that's the sense of Dreamweaver. An amazing expansion for anyone doing web design that doesnt need to pay a hundred or so dollars for Dreamweaver. This staggering privacy encyclopedia has some disturbing warnings for how to acknowledge it.

Server Switcher (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/2409/) quickly switch between websites on your own development and live machines by pressing the switch server icon.

SEO for Firefox (http://tools.seobook.com/firefox/seo-for-firefox.html) draws of good use market research data directly into Google's and Yahoo!'s search engine results, including Google PR, Age, links, Alexa position, WHOIS, and more. It also provides a couple of helpful links towards the top of the search pages, including Google Traffic Estimator, Google Trends, and the Overture View Bid tool.

Still Another Window Resizer (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/2498/) lets you resize browser window to default screen resolutions.

AdSense Preview (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/2132/) preview the Google AdSense adverts that would seem on that page. That is extremely useful if you are considering putting AdSense on a site and dont need to have the hassle of signing up for a free account and putting the ads up only to find out which kind of ads will show.

Display grab (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/1146/) has a screenshot of the webpage and saves it as an image file. This saves a lot of time compared to the method I used to use have a screenshot and available the image to be cropped by Adobe Photoshop.

Server Spy (https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/2036/) shows what make of HTTP server (Apache, IIS, etc.) runs on the visited website on the side of the browser..